Loeffler pledges to back Collins if she comes up short after bitter contest

By: - November 3, 2020 10:35 am

Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler kicked off the last leg of her campaign the same way she has spent most of it, touting her outsider status and conservative voting record.

“Georgians know that they have a strong group of champions in Washington, being their voice every single day,” she said. “That’s why I’m encouraging Georgians to get out and vote. If you’re my voice today, I will be your voice for years to come.”

Sen. Kelly Loeffler spoke with reporters at Cobb County International Airport early on Election Day before jetting off to campaign stops around the state. Ross Williams/Georgia Recorder

Loeffler spoke with reporters for about ten minutes at Cobb County International Airport Tuesday morning, the first of five stops across the state on the final day of voting.

Loeffler was appointed by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp to replace Sen. Johnny Isakson, but she faces a crowded field of candidates who all want to grab her seat. Most polls put Democrat Raphael Warnock in the top spot with around 40% of the vote, with Loeffler battling U.S. Rep. Doug Collins for second place among Republicans.

It is unlikely any candidate will receive more than 50% of the vote, meaning the top two vote-getters will all but certainly face off in a January runoff.

Loeffler expressed confidence in her ability to win over moderates in a two-person race without alienating her conservative base.

“The American dream, it lifts all Americans up, all Georgians,” she said. “It has nothing to do with party, but we have to stand up against socialism and socialist ideas. Things like high taxes, expanding government, excessive regulation, the Green New Deal that would not only bankrupt families but farmers. We have to make sure that our policies work for hardworking Georgians.”

Sen. Kelly Loeffler spoke with reporters at Cobb County International Airport early on Election Day before jetting off to campaign stops around the state. Ross Williams/Georgia Recorder

The race has at times felt like a Republican primary, with Loeffler and Collins battering each other over who has the more conservative record. But despite the bitter competition, Loeffler said she will support Collins should he win.

“I have been a conservative champion my whole life, I’m a lifelong Republican, I will support the Republican Party as I always have done,” she said. “But let me just say, I think we’re gonna win.”

Warnock is scheduled to make ten campaign stops around the Atlanta area on Election Day. Collins had no campaign events listed on his Election Day schedule before a 7 p.m. victory party in Buford.

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Ross Williams
Ross Williams

Before joining the Georgia Recorder, Ross Williams covered local and state government for the Marietta Daily Journal.Williams' reporting took him from City Hall to homeless camps, from the offices of business executives to the living rooms of grieving parents. His work earned recognition from the Georgia Associated Press Media Editors and the Georgia Press Association, including beat reporting, business writing and non-deadline reporting. A native of Cobb County, Williams holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Atlanta's Oglethorpe University and a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University.

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